The Case For Children:

Why Parenthood Makes Your World Better
by Simcha Weinstein

December 2012 | $16.00 | Paperback | ISBN: 978-1-56980-474-2

Throughout the Western world, young men and women are doing everything in their prime reproductive years except for reproducing. Never before in human history have birth rates intentionally fallen so far, so fast and in so many places.

Recently voted, “New York’s Hippest Rabbi” by PBS affiliate Channel 13, best-selling author Simcha Weinstein’s ‘The Case for Children’ is intended to be a candid, honest exploration of why young people aren't having children. While an entire generation of grandmothers-in-waiting is praying impatiently for a little bundle of joy (or two or three), their daughters and sons aren't cooperating. Fathers are scolded for bringing new little consumers and polluters into the world, and mothers, in particular, get grief for choosing childbearing over careers.

Rabbi Simcha Weinstein’s uncompromisingly sensible solutions fly in the face of traditional ideas, explaining how having more children can actually be a boon to your bottom line without necessarily increasing your carbon footprint. This book was written specifically to spark debate, and its direct challenge to “childfree movement” manifestos will inspire younger adults to participate in this all-important discussion. The author’s media savvy, along with the book’s inherently intriguing subject matter make for a winning combination in terms of “buzz”.  You may even wonder why you waited so long to have children!

Simcha Weinstein

 

Rabbi Simcha Weinstein is an internationally known, best-selling author. His first book "Up, Up and Oy Vey!," received the Benjamin Franklin Award for the best book of 2007. He has appeared on CNN Showbiz Tonight and NPR, and has been profiled in leading publications, including The New YorkTimes, The Miami Herald and The London Guardian.  He is a contributor to The Jerusalem Post and The Jewish Telegraphic Agency (JTA), The Royal Shakespeare Company, Condé Nast and other publications and chairs the Religious Affairs Committee at the renowned New York art school, Pratt Institute. Rabbi Weinstein resides in Brooklyn, NY.